Tuesday, April 7, 2020

Westward Ho! Featuring Plan B (Distance Learning) and the Math of STREAM

Science Technology Reading Engineering Art MATH!

As we integrate our study of Westward Expansion 
across the curriculum,
all the above subject areas are included.

MATH:
(Scroll down for Plan B)


Keeping a ledger, making a budget, making expensive decisions, making trades, keeping track of mileage, using map scale, addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, fractions - all these skills come in handy (and sometimes save our lives) as we travel the Oregon Trail. It's a good thing the first- through fourth- graders have strong mathematical and problem solving skills! 


A Conestoga wagon is bigger but more expensive. $250.

Most wagon groups chose the smaller emigrant wagon for $150.


We wonder if there will be ways to earn money along the trail.

As we travel further along the trail, 
we discover that prices go up. 
The cost of a pair of oxen doubles! 
Plus we have to get new shoes for all our animals. 

Most had never used a map scale before.

We figured out that 1 cm = 100 miles.

Using string and a ruler, most of us figured out 
that the journey is about 2,100 miles.

Not too far from the actual 2,170 miles!

PLAN B

When we learned that we were going to go home to do school, 
this was the story we heard:

Travel and Fate Card 27B (AKA Plan B)
One mile past Alkali Slough
Mile 799
July 21

Your wagon train has just set out early in the morning and has come to the top of a knoll. In the distance on the valley floor is something of a curiosity. You’re not sure what it is, yet. After two hours of walking towards it, it appears to be a group of wagons.  Yes, it is for sure another wagon train! But what is it doing out here on the prairie in the middle of the day? Why isn’t it moving!? Is something wrong. Or could it be a trap!?

(Discuss with your wagon group and decide what you should do! Should you steer clear or should you stop to see if you should help?)

Fate: Well, while the adults in your group were gathered around making decisions, the children in your group have started intermingling with the children in the stalled wagon train. And they’ve discovered that these children are nice. In fact, they’d like to become friends! They learn their names…[names of siblings of the first through fourth graders].

Since the children are having so much fun, the adults decide to find out what’s wrong and discover that this wagon train has been lost for days and are in dire need of help. The adults make the decision to help them.

The two wagon trains become one long wagon train. Each wagon gets new family members! And not only that, the two wagon trains are pooling funds and each wagon gets $500 in their accounts It’s time to start a new ledger and get packing. We want to get past the Rocky Mountains before the snow starts flying.

Westward? Ho!!

(That money is going to come in handy! We’ve discovered that getting supplies is getting more and more expensive the further west we go! And we’re running low on oxen!)

Distance Learning Math

Here's what happens at Fort Hall:
(as turned in via our distance learning platform)

Who wouldn't buy fox and beaver fur 
with that much money in the account!?
I think we'll survive the snowfall in the mountains 
and make it to the Willamette Valley!

Real math at its finest!!


Westward Ho! Featuring the Art of STREAM

Science Technology Reading Engineering ART Math!

As we integrate our study of Westward Expansion 
across the curriculum,
all the above subject areas are included.


Art:

Using Draw Write Now book number 5, the Navigators did a great job creating 3-D drawings of a covered wagons and an oxen.












More art is being explored as 
we have moved to distance learning.

Stay tuned!

Tuesday, March 17, 2020

Westward Ho! Featuring the Engineering of STREAM

Science Technology Reading ENGINEERING Art Math!

As we integrate our study of Westward Expansion 
across the curriculum,
all the above subject areas are included.

ENGINEERING:


Just as the early pioneers needed to be able to plan, work together, improvise, solve problems, create, design, engineer, construct, take risks, go back to the drawing board, learn from mistakes, and much more, the Seabury first through fourth grade wagon groups are learning similar skills. 

Project 1: Can you make a wagon using the available supplies that will hold the most weight?
Bonus: Include accessories.

All 8 wagon groups set off to work:

The planning stage:



The engineering/construction stage:

Making an axle.

Using pipe cleaners to hold up the cover.

Lids make good wheels.

This group had to go back to the drawing board 
when their wheels collapsed.

The finishing touches:

The cover

Some quilts

Ta da!

Ta da!


The testing stage:

They all are so unique.


All are ready to see how they did.

How many water bottles can your wagon hold?
Most are able to hold at least 6 bottles!




Project 2: Can you make a raft using the available supplies that will float a wagon for the longest period of time?

The planning stage:



Comparing plans

The engineering/construction stage:


Supplies include 20 popsicle sticks.

Supplies include glue.

Supplies include three feet of tape.
We treated it very carefully!


Supplies include three feet of yarn. 

The test stage:




Most wagons floated for over 6 hours!

Project 3: Can you make a barrel using the available supplies that will hold water?

Supplies included clothespins, a toilet paper tube, one yard of string, and scraps of construction paper.

This is serious work.

We're getting this collaboration thing down!

What's the best way to do this?


They look like barrels but will they hold water?

The test stage:

We discover that it is difficult to make a barrel that holds water without using plastic!

Project 4: Can you make a temporary shelter using the available supplies that will shelter four pioneers?

Gathering supplies from nature:

We get some dirt for the foundation.

Some make a tepee shape out of sticks.

The three feet of "rope" come in handy.

This one is more of a burrow.

This one is almost like a lean-to.

The sticks on this one are arranged more like a pup tent. 

The test stage:

Most of the temporary shelters could hold all four pioneers.

 
We're not sure if they would all withstand a heavy wind storm.


As you can tell, Thursday Engineering Day has become one of our favorite parts of Westward Ho!

The students are having so much fun and don't even realize that the skills they are learning today are equipping them for their future jobs which don't even exist yet!

Westward? Ho!! 


Westward Ho! Featuring Plan B (Distance Learning) and the Math of STREAM

Science Technology Reading Engineering Art MATH! As we integrate our study of Westward Expansion  across the curriculum, all the ab...